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The ROI of Getting Involved

the roi of getting involved

METAMORWORKS/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

What is the key to the success of AGC’s initiatives? Active and engaged AGC members.

AGC volunteers are the core of every program, initiative and resource that is developed to support the growth of the construction industry. Every action a member takes to contribute their experience and expertise, big or small, impacts how AGC serves and supports our members. From taking time to responding to a survey or write an article, to serving a full term on one of our national committees, AGC’s volunteers shape the future and direction of our great industry.

But who has the time? We are all so busy with work and life that it may seem like there are not enough hours in the day to add volunteering to your already busy schedule. However, the connections you will make and expertise you will gain by volunteering with AGC can have a tremendous impact on your growth and professional development. And, while only taking a few hours of your time each month, the benefits of volunteering with AGC may just outweigh the time it takes. We connected with a few of AGC’s champions and asked them to share their reasons why and how their involvement has made an impact on their career.

Catina Anderson, director of pre-construction at National Custom Corporate Services, started her involvement at an AGC student chapter at Kennesaw State University and currently serves as an AGC ambassador.

“By getting more involved with AGC I have learned more about the dire needs of our workforce and how not only do we need to get more involved with students early on to expose them to the different roles in our industry but also how diversity & inclusion — as well as the Culture of Care — can make a major impact on the generations that are coming up behind us.”

Anderson believes “getting involved as a volunteer with AGC has benefited me professionally because I have been blessed to receive many employment opportunities across the United States that has catapulted my career. I have gone from working two full-time jobs to put myself through college as a single parent while working a part-time internship with a mechanical contractor to becoming the director of preconstruction for a general contractor and finally having the ability to create my own work-life balance. Personally, being a part of AGC put a fire in my belly to want to help create real change in our industry as well as my community…”

Lainee Perala, project manager at Perlo Construction Group, Inc., shares a similar story of starting her involvement with another AGC student chapter and then continuing her engagement by serving on the Construction Leadership Council Steering Committee and on the Diversity and Inclusion Steering Committee.

“There’s so much opportunity for growth and change at the national level,” Perala says. “You can really see the improvements that you are making in the construction world.”

Currently serving on the AGC Board of Governors, Construction Leadership Council Steering Committee, and the Surety Bonding and Risk Management Committee, Gaines Moorer, vice president at Lakeview Risk Partners, LLC, says getting involved with AGC helped him grow both personally and professionally.

“I’ve met friends and mentors throughout the country, expanded my network tremendously, and had the opportunity to engage in philanthropic opportunities I never before knew existed.”

The path to involvement can look different for every individual member. Some start while they are in school, others are further into their career when they decide to get more involved. Regardless of how or when you start, the volunteer pathway leads to new connections and great opportunities.

Henry Nutt, preconstruction executive at Southland Industries, has served in many volunteer roles, currently serving as chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Steering Committee and on the AGC Board of Directors.

“Initially I was asked by one of our executive VPs to fill in for a meeting in the Building Division,” Nutt says. “With the circles being so small between divisions, I then found myself connecting with members from other committees, and found inspiration from their specific mission along with my own passion towards that particular group’s goals. Hence, my involvement with the D&I Steering Committee. Overall, I have grown as much as I have served, if not more. The experiences and opportunity to work with others that care about advancing our industry has been worth all the effort and has definitely enhanced my career.”

Echoing that statement is Kari Karst, president of BX Civil and Construction, Inc., who has served on the AGC Board of Directors, Board of Governors, Specialty Contractors Council Steering Committee, along with several other volunteer roles

“When you get involved, the benefits that you receive far outweigh the time you dedicate to being involved,” Karst says.

Beyond personal growth, the countless benefits of volunteering your time include growing your company’s portfolio as well.

“Some of the best projects we have ever had have started from relationships formed through AGC,” shares Les Snyder, executive vice president of Infrastructure Construction at Brightline West and senior vice president, AGC Board of Directors.

By sharing your unique experience with a group of members and collectively working together to create change there is a ripple effect on those following in your footsteps. AGC members can make a meaningful impact on the progression of the construction industry and on how AGC supports other members while advancing your own career and contributing to your company’s success. Why not share your knowledge and the skills you have while adding to your own toolbox? Your engagement may even surprise you by uncovering hidden talents and ideas. Raise your hand, join the conversation, and construct your pathway to success.